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that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a horse since the day he got here. and thanks to carlin's leadership, thanks to marvin pinkert who he calls the genius behind the development of the new space, all of us as citizens can far better experience our history. as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen i value this place deeply. it's ve
has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen, i value this place deeply. it's very, very important. your participation is urged because it's a good thing and for an additional reason, that my vocal chords may fail sometimes but i'm going to go for it, and let's hope i can keep on talking. the two days -- no. i want to add one more thing about the archives. john said it, and it's true. people like me, who want to research american history, are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i, and my research assistants, including josh is
with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
-in that are tragedies. i mean you have john f. kennedy being killed in dallas and lyndon johnson quickly being sworn in. or when warren harding tied and coolidge sworn in. there are many examples of that. the simplicity of this, the fact that the weather is good. this is important that we remind ourselves today that we are all americans. we're not democrats. we're not republicans. we're not independents. this is our president for a second term >> pelley: there's so many rancor in an election immediately preceding an inauguration and so much rancor as policy gets to be made. inauguration day is a 24-hour period when that all seems to be put away >> one hopes so. we live in these you know, just terrible partisan times right now. but let's put the bickering aside. i think the fun of tomorrow is going to be guessing what's the president going to say? it's going to be 50 years this year of the "i have a dream speech" of martin luther king. 150 years of the emancipation proclamation. they have this historic african-american president. once again he said barack hussein obama today. using his middle name like
of the "wall street journal." joe califano, once an aid to lyndon johnson. taylor branch, author of a new book on race. and james peterson of lehigh university. we'll round it out with the newest brother act in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air, dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe, architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria, where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning, bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated
in public spaces? >> i think very carefully, just as in navigated the relationship with lyndon johnson. he went out of his way to avoid taking a public position opposed to johnson on the war or poverty issues. it was only after a great deal of deliberation, a great deal of time had passed, and when he felt like he could do nothing else other than take a public stance. that is what is going on in the black community today. i think all of us recognize that the energy has to come from the grassroots. that those of us who feel that the president needs to go further, and i think it barack obama were sitting here, he would say, yes, i like to go farther in terms of dealing with these issues of poverty and specific issues of the black community, but he would also say, you have to push me. that does not necessarily come from him deciding which are the greatest party as he has to deal with. just as johnson also said, look, i have a lot of priorities as president. if you love me to deal with is a voting rights issue, as king did in 1964 and 1965, you have to push me. king went out and helped stage t
with democratic leaders, lyndon johnson. i talked with the brookings scholar who was a young aide in the eisenhower white house. he said eisenhower was deeply not do anything. an and lbj but he knew to make things work you had to have this getting along. the key difference here is johnson, rayburn, o'neal, they could deliver. this president does not have someone who can deliver and in the senate, republicans have abused the fill bupser. -- filibuster. >> describe eisenhower? >> he was devious. >> he was the most devious person nixon had ever known. you said, i mean that in a positive sense. >> they could work together. >> reagan was not actually dealing with a house my majority, -- minority, that there was a conservative majority in the house. when you add the republicans and conservative democrats. what we had was ideological sorting since then of the the parties were nor geographical. nowadays if you're conservative, you're republican. if you're a liberal, you're a democrat. obama is up against an actual majority of conservative house members. reagan didn't have to face a majori
, eisenhower worked quietly behind the scenes with the senate majority leader, lyndon johnson, to gain approval of his legislative agenda. ronald reagan developed a close relationship with the democratic speaker of the house tip o'neill, to somehow fulfill his legislative goals, compromise as they were. it might be cynical to postulate that some of nixon's rather liberal legislations forays were prompted by his desire to get along with a democratic-controlled congress. woodrow wilson was the target of republican party that wanted to even many a squabble they had with the president. he defeated both william howard taft and theodore roosevelt to win his first term. he spearheaded liberal legislation they opposed, and got approval of the league of nations that would be selected to vent republican party hostility to wilson. the treaty was never approved. the votes were there for approval, but the president allowed compromise, but wilson stood firm. it was the president, not congress, that refused to compromise. one of the most successful relationships between a president and congress occurred durin
with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've been in jail. he won the nobel prize and he's still in jail in selma on the right to vote. and the aids simply told dr. king you've got to say you had a purpose. let's say that you're coming out of jail to meet with the president. and that infuriated lyndon johnson because he said nobody in the expense of here in the middle of a controversy. i'm trying to run the country. but on the matter and, he didn't want to say i won't meet with dr. martin luther king partly because he shared the goal of cutting the voting rights bill. so with the work of was kind of an ego where they said dr. king was officially coming up to
is the king of them all so it's a little bit of a -- lyndon johnson picked up a couple. lyndon johnson and again i'm using every authority i can find. but lyndon johnson i'm sure he picked this up from -- but pressing the flesh was johnson-ism. i will be down there in a flash and lady bird gets credit for motorcade. didn't exist before she comes up with motorcade and it's picked up by "time" magazine. there is no elise written example that has been used before. richard nixon has some nice ones. depending on your point of view. the silent majority is his and excellent ability is a coinage that either he or his speechwriters when they're going over the records of the watergate they use that term. if something is censored or bleeped its deleted which became its own curse word. another one which was really interesting is when he started talking about winding down the war. and winding down seemed to be sort of a winding up. it created some real response at that time. george herbert walker bush came up with new world order which was his. he got that from somewhere else that made it his own a
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger. it's easy to point to the national security or economic consequences impact on the ratings have been i
's a little bit of -- um, lyndon johnson had some nice ones, but lyndon johnson picked up a couple -- lyndon johnson, again, i'm using every authority i can find, but i'm sure he picked this up. pressing the flesh was a johnsonism. i'll be down there pressing the flesh. and ladybird gets credit for motorcade. that doesn't exist before she comes up with motorcade, and it's picked up by "time" magazine. there's no at least written example of that being used before that. um, richard nixon has some nice ones. he -- depending on your point of view -- but silent majority is his, deleted a coinage of his speech writers when they're going over the records of the watergate, their use of term instead of saying censored they used the term expletive deleted which became its own sort of curse word. another one which was very interesting at the time, created quite a stir was when he talked about, started talking about winding down the war and winding down seemed to be sort of -- you know, we're winding up, it was few to american ears and created -- it was new to american ears and created some real respons
president to be sworn in by a woman? president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street now, and we're going to talk to a woman who knows a thing or two about money. our good friend suze orman is with us. we're going to speak with her after this. ♪ ng, and teaching it took to earn it. so we give you the power to keep as much of your hard-earned money as possible. our customized interview covers everything from a service member's deployment, to a student's loan interest, right down to a teacher's crayons. you've worked hard to earn your money. we're here to help you keep it. turbotax-- the power to keep what's yours. t
consequences for it. >> he has been compared to lyndon johnson i think lyndon johnson used profanity strategically and as a bully tactic. when you're in a position of rahm emmanuel and you swear at somebody you can swear at them but they can't swear at you. just the fact that you're using profanity. one of the cases where this came up, this was in jonathan aldridge's book "the promise" take your f-ing tampons out and tell me what you have to have to say. that came up when a former senator wanted to make his temperament an issue. she said, no tampons. let's talk about tampons. this is not about tampons but how women would feel about someone who does that in the workplace. so i would say that it lowered the tone of the mayoral debates. >> after--sorry, after that the mayor grabbed me by the arm. his bodyguards came in. the question is has it been an affective management strategy in chicago? can you talk about the union strike, how did it go? how did it go when the mayor behaved this way? >> i would say no, because one of the most famous stories he was meeting with karen lewis president
to raise in. in the election, president lyndon johnson withdrew from the race, and hubert humphrey was nominated. on election night, george wallace one five states as an independent nominee. here is a resident nixon's swearing in and, about 20 minutes. -- and speech, about 20 minutes. >> do you richard milhouse nixon solemnly swear that you will faithfully exit queue the office -- >> that i will faithfully execute the office >> of president of the united states. >> of president of the united states. >> and will, to the best of my ability, observe protect and defend the constitution of the united states so that you got. >> and will, to the best of my ability, observe protect and defend the constitution of the united states, so help me god. [applause] ♪ >> senator dirksen, mr. chief justice, mr. vice president, president johnson, vice president humphrey, my fellow americans, and my fellow citizens of the world community, i ask you to share with me today the majesty of this moment. in the orderly transfer of power, we celebrate the unity that keeps us free. each moment in history i
in the nation's capital with estimates ranging as high as 1.9 million people. until then, lyndon johnson held the record crowd of 1.2 million in 1965. attendance for president obama's second inauguration is projected to be lower than his first. president george w. bush's second inaugural in 2005 drew up to 500,000 people.>> it may be sot before we get the official estimate of the crowd here, certainly not 1.8 million who were here in 2009, but estimates before the inauguration ranged from 600,000 to 800,000 but what we can report to you is that there were a lot of americans in the national mall today who were overjoyed to witness history, inauguration of any president is a remarkable moment in american history. and they were there today, many of them with their children to see these events. the president was inaugurated of course under the -- in the shadow i probably should say, the capitol dome. a fascinating thing about the dome of the capitol, this year is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the capitol dome. something that was mentioned today during the president's inauguration. h
sarah hughes who was summoned to duty aboard air force one with lyndon johnson following a national tragedy, for the fourth time in our nation's history a woman has sworn in either the president or the vice president of the united states. i had a chance to sit down with justice sotomayor this week to talk about her historic moment. >> i was thinking just a couple of days ago if i think back of when i was a kid, which of the two events would have seemed more improbable to me. i realized each one was so far fetched that i couldn't have imagined either. >> supreme court, swearing in the vice president? >> supreme court or swearing in the vice president in front of the nation and the world. >> does it make you anxious? >> anxiety is not the word. >> and you talked to her, soledad, about how she's perceived on the bench. >> yeah. and she's considered to be very tough and she doesn't really mind or care what people have -- have that analysis of how she is on the bench. here's what she told me. >> i think the noblest profession in the world is lawyering and if a lawyer showed up who wasn't
is the day that 40 years ago today, lyndon johnson died. i think he would have recognized and probably admired that speech yesterday very much. and i think one way of understanding it is to look at it as a reply to ronald reagan in 1981. in the same place ronald reagan got up and said government is not the solution to the problem, government is the problem. yesterday was sort of not only a response to that but almost a bookend as reagan moved the country in a conservative direction. barack obama obviously hopes to move it in a liberal direction. >> the "new york times" editorial had this to say. mr. obama is smart enough to know that what he wants to achieve in his second term must be done in the next two years, perhaps even the first 18 months. there is no doubt that mr. obama has the ambition and intellect to place himself in the first rank of presidents. with this speech, he has made a forceful argument for a progressive agenda that meets the nation's needs. we hope he has the political will and tactical instincts to carry it out. lot of things in that quote, but one that struck me,
, right? lyndon johnson is getting sworn in on air force one. roosevelt had to go to a house in buffalo. there's one where mckinley died and one where roosevelt was sworn in and he kind of stumbled through it all, yeah i got the oath. so he didn't have his hand on the bible. he said a few words, but he became president. it reminds us that things are sometimes haphazard at inaugurations. we don't get to pre plain like we do for this one. >> president obama's first inauguration drew record crowds. how do you think it will be remembered? >> i have kids who have the place mat and on it you have presidents on it. it's all white faces and now you have the first african-american. man, was that historic. you had people pouring in here electricity in the air. it didn't matter what the speech was that year. it was about the atmospherics. this time around i think the speech the president gives is going to be more important. they're having less balls, less crowds, more enthusiasm. he can make up for that by having words that may some day be carved in marble. >> douglas brinkley.
him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said yeah we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number one. at the end of the day, that's what people want to see, you working with the administration. to joe's point, you don't have to agree with everything but
he utilize the power, the threat of power of the presidency the way lyndon johnson did with regard to resolutions during the course of the vietnam war? one senator voting against him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district, call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called, lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said, yeah, we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number
. john f. kennedy from 1961. george h. w. bush from 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. jimmy carter from 1977. george w. bush from 2001. starting at 8 p.m. eastern on c- span. >> why did you write a book about your experience? >> i felt that the perspective should be brought to bear. there were some things that i felt were not completely accurate. i thought it was important for the story will -- but historical record. people need to understand their different policy options and disagreements. if you want to prevent this crisis from happening again, the public itself needs to engage more on financial reform and educate themselves. i tried to make the book accessible. i hope people will look into it. >> sheila bair on the government's role in that worst financial crisis. sunday night at 8 p.m. on c- span's "q&a." >> kent conrad and judd gregg talked about ways to balance the federal budget. they spoke for just under an hour at this event hosted by the u.s. chamber of commerce. [applause] >> first senator gregg. >> thank you, marc. i appreciate that. that was quite an introduction. it is fr
highest totals of filibusters every recorded. lyndon johnson faced one filibuster during his six years as senate majority leader. in the same span of time, harry reid has faced over 390. lyndon johnson, one; harry reid, 390. legislation is blocked at every turn. the result is not surprising. the senate of the 112th congress passed a record low 2.8% of bills introduced. that's a 66% decrease from the last republican majority in 20 2005-2006 and a 90% decrease from the high in 1955-1956. by every measure, the 112th congress was the most unproductive congress in our history. my republican colleagues have come to the floor and made many impassioned statements in opposition to amending our rules at the beginning of this congress. they say that the rules can only be changed with a two-thirds supermajority, as the current filibuster rule requires. they argue that any attempt to amend the rules by a simple majority is breaking the rules to change the rules. this is simply not true. the supermajority requirement to change senate rules is in direct conflict with the u.s. constitution. article 1,
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
. who was the first president to be sworn in by a woman. president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street now, and we're going to talk to a woman who knows a thing or two about money. our good friend suzy or man is with us. we're going to speak with her after this. i was living with this all-over pain. a deep, throbbing, persistent ache. my doctor diagnosed it as fibromyalgia, thought to be the result of overactive nerves that cause chronic widespread pain. lyrica is believed to calm these nerves. i learned lyrica can provide significant relief from fibromyalgia pain. and for some people, it can work in as earl
in order to bring us into a new era. one of the things that lyndon johnson said famously is that when a president is elected, he's for six months he's a giraffe and thereafter a worm, so his great challenge is going to be how he figures out how to make the most of this time as a giraffe. >> let's go back outside to so sole ya vega. >> i'm here. hey, good afternoon. we made our way over from the pentagon where we were at the staging area and came over on a bus full of teenager matching band from tennessee. they were really excited and we walked our way through the mall here and made our way close to the capitol. you can see a lot of the crowd is dissipating. a lot are headed over to that paid we'll see later this afternoon. we heard all of our friends, david muir and bill weir talking about the excitement and the level of excitement you can feel just walking through this crowd. it's so palpable. one woman i just met while making my way over stopped me in my tracks during the invocation, she literally had tears streaming down her face and i said why are you so emotional? she said my gra
nixon from 1969. john kennedy in 1961. george bush at 10:00 eastern at 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. the jakarta from 1977. at 11:00, george w. bush and his 2001 inauguration. -- lyndon johnson -- jimmy carter in 1977. that is coming up at 8:00 eastern tomorrow night on c- span. our inauguration coverage kicks off this weekend as president obama begins his second term. the official swearing-in ceremony is sunday at the white house. we will have live coverage. we will also include your phone calls. we will begin with a look back at president obama's 2009 inaugural address. then on monday, the public inaugural ceremonies with the swearing in at noon, the capitol luncheon, and a parade down pennsylvania avenue. coverage begins at 7:00 eastern here on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. join the conversation throughout the day on facebook and twitter. >> the greatest honor history can be so is the title of peacemaker. this honor now beckons america the chance to help lead the world of last out of the valley of turmoil and on to that high ground of peace that man has dreamed of since t
tell you, brian, this is -- it's unreal to me. it is unbelievable. as lyndon johnson would say it's like history and fate coming together. for this president, this african-american, to be inaugura inaugurated for a second time on martin luther king day and can look out and see the likeness of martin luther king. to see jefferson, to see lincoln. it is just unreal. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious amer
, 1969, richard nixon, john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush in 1989, lyndon johnson from 1965, president jimmy carter in 1977, and we will wrap up the night at 11:00 eastern with president george w. bush speech from 19 -- from 2001. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear that i will execute the office of president of the an ad states faithfully -- >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "that i will faithfully execute the office of president of united states. then barack obama stops, paused, smiled, as if to say, "c'mon, man, this is my big day, you got to get this right." unfortunately, he did not get it right, so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time, and they got it right. >> the history of democracy's big day, monday at 8:00 a.m. part of a three-day holiday "book tv."c-span's >> the house in for a brief protest for a session this afternoon. party leaders have been sounding ou
johnson. that's true. >> anybody compared to bill clinton and lyndon johnson -- not going to change really in that sense. he is who he is. he doesn't want to appear to be inauthentic about it. one of the things about bill clinton was he was what i call an authentic phony. everybody believed what he was saying at the moment. barack obama always had more difficult time trying to act that up. but as he said the other day, you know, he is a nice enough guy. echoed what he said about hillary. nice enough, too. >> that line didn't go over so well the first time. >> he was talking about himself a little easier maybe. >> maybe. but do -- does he enjoy politics? >> yes. well, he enjoys politics but enjoys other things as well. you know, i -- i think that he -- he's learning how to really sort of merge that with the other aspects of what he enjoys which is policy and rest of life. >> can i say two words? joe biden. that's what joe biden is for. he does the things the president really dislikes doing. i mean, it is -- if the president doesn't like to glad hand and hang out with members of congress, th
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)